IPR Curiosities and Fun Facts

IPR is the right to prevent someone from using (for different reasons) the copyrighter or protected asset. Therefore, we have compiled a few curious facts related to the IPR field:

1. You can Trademark a Scent
But it is not as straightforward as you think. For example, a company cannot trademark the scent of its perfume. Such was the case of Chanel, who failed to register the Scent of “Chanel No .5” as an Intellectual Property (IP).
A scent can only become a trademark when it is not related to the aspect (nature) of the good or service the company provides. It can only be an additional factor. One of the first examples of olfactory trademarks in the EU was by the Sushimoto Rubbers Co., registering a unique smell (rose-based) as an asset for its tyres. 
 
2. You can Trademark a Colour
Well, more like a shade of a colour. It can become a trademark if a colour has significant consumer recognition and a strong sense of association with the product. For example, Louboutin Red is a trademarked colour in the USA but not Europe. Louboutin could not settle on these exclusive rights in the EU’s IPR law.  

3. You can Trademark a Sound
After the news on smells and colours, it is not as shocking that one can trademark a sound. Some of the most recognisable Audio protected as IPR are the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer’s Lion roar and Lucasfilm’s Darth Vader breathing sound.

4. IPR generates almost 30-40% of employment in the EU
According to the European Patent Office report, in 2017-2019, IPR-heavy industries generated 29.7% of the EU’s employment. It can get up to 39.4%, counting the auxiliary and indirect jobs it creates. This all constituted 47.1% of the European GDP.

5. Green” IP is not so rare
The same data showed that 9.3% of employment and 14% of GDP are covered by Climate Change Mitigation Technologies and “green” solutions and trademarks